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How to See More Art Online in 2017

How to See More Art Online in 2017

Set yourself a New Year's resolution to balance out reading all those hot takes and think pieces with more art. Here are some handy tips

If you're feeling burnt out every time you read a thinkpiece on Medium, or can't look away from the hot takes on Twitter, try setting yourself up for more surprise run-ins with the art world. Follow this tips and you won't even have to seek it out: the art will hit you like a splash of cool water. 

Google Art Project web extension - See fresh fine art every time you open a new tab in Google Chrome. I absolutely adore this extension, and by clicking through the link that accompanies each image, I have learned a lot about images and artists that catch my eye. Frequently I find an image I like and just leave my browser open on it when I walk away from my desk. You can also reshare them directly onto Twitter and Facebook to help intrigue your friends and followers. 

Tineye Chrome extension - figure out where that amazing image you saw on Tumblr or Pinterest might have come from with Tineye's powerful reverse image searching. Select Sort by Oldest for best results when trying to find proper creator attribution.

Check out art hashtags. Here are a few.

  • #SciArt  -  the best of both worlds, images at the intersection of art and science.
  • #colourcollective (make sure you put that British/Canadian "u" in "colour"). Every week, artists post works created incorporating a specific colour and share them on Fridays. See the official account @Clr_Collective for each week's upcoming colour. This Friday - Dark Phthalo Green!
  • #drawdinovember - Although it just ended, you can still find amazing work by paleo artists drawing dinosaurs and other prehistoric life. Official account: @drawdinovember
  • #artadventcalendar and #illo_advent - artists sharing work daily from December 1st to 24th. The former hashtag, #artadventcalendar was started by painter @JayIsPainting last year, and the latter hashtag, #illo_advent, was created by artist @PennyNevilleLee, who also started #colourcollective.

Follow rotating curator  ("RoCur") accounts. Typically these accounts switch who's tweeting from them on a weekly basis.

  • @IAmSciArt - started by @vexedmuddler, a different artist engaging with science every week.
  • @WetheHumanities - a rotating account of people from across the humanities, including artists and art historians. I participated once and it led to some interesting conversations.
  • @iamscicomm - a science communication rotating curator account, it's relatively rare to find artists here, but worth it to learn more about science communication experiences. The discussions often veer into image-territory.
  • @womensart1 - not a rotating curator account, but an excellent steady stream of tweets of art by women, from all art movements. 

Make a Twitter List. Now that you've checked out all those artsy hashtags, start adding the cool new artists you've found to a dedicated Twitter list. And when all the Trump thinkpieces are overwhelming you, pop on over into your art list. Here's how to make a public or private Twitter list.

Feel free to add more tips below, or tell us on Twitter @Symbiartic! How do you add art to your life online? 

Art versus Trump Roundup

Art versus Trump Roundup

Stop Saying Art Will Flourish under Trump

Stop Saying Art Will Flourish under Trump